Veganism

I went vegan for 30 days as an experiment. Here’s why I’m sticking with it. – Yahoo Lifestyle

Summary

I went vegan for 30 days. Here’s how it went. (Photo: Getty)

I was around 10 when I declared to my parents that I was going vegetarian. I had always loved animals and, upon falling down a rabbit hole into disturbing slaughterhouse footage during computer class, thought that I should no longer eat them. My parents didn’t really think the whole thing would stick — after all, I was the kid who ordered the adult-sized plate of ribs at our local chain steakhouse.

The thing is, though…….

npressfetimg-2273.png

I went vegan for 30 days. Here’s how it went. (Photo: Getty)

I was around 10 when I declared to my parents that I was going vegetarian. I had always loved animals and, upon falling down a rabbit hole into disturbing slaughterhouse footage during computer class, thought that I should no longer eat them. My parents didn’t really think the whole thing would stick — after all, I was the kid who ordered the adult-sized plate of ribs at our local chain steakhouse.

The thing is, though —it did stick. While I eventually incorporated fish into my diet, the only bacon, burgers, chicken nuggets and ribs I’ve consumed over the last two decades are of the plant-based variety. (MorningStar’s microwavable ribs: Don’t knock ’em until you’ve tried ’em.)

My pescatarian diet was ridiculously easy to stick to, and I felt good about it for a long time. Sure, I was basically consuming my weight in brie weekly, but at least it wasn’t quite the same as indulging in a porterhouse steak…right? Maybe, but I was still eating animal-derived products — and I knew that wasn’t exactly ideal. 

There was never one “lightbulb” moment that made me realize that dairy and eggs were in fact doing the harm to animals I had hoped to avoid — instead, it was a bunch of smaller, compounding things over the years that made my brain reconsider my diet.

There were documentaries like Cowspiracy and What the Health? that asked big questions about animal agriculture’s impact on our well-being and the environment. Those docs certainly didn’t make me want a glass of milk, but it was the more personal accounts of animal suffering that really got to me. I visited the Gentle Barn, an animal organization in Los Angeles that rescues many animals from dairy farms and slaughterhouses (where I hugged several cows in tiny top hats). While others were side-eying one another over Joaquin Phoenix’s Best Actor Oscar speech for Joker, which he made about the plight of dairy cows, I couldn’t help but think, “Well, yeah, odd timing, but … doesn’t he have a point?” 

After all, he’s right: In the United States, the average dairy cow on a factory farm is kept in tight quarters for most of her life. She’s artificially inseminated so that she can produce milk and then separated from her calf, who, if male, is typically sent off to slaughter. That may become the mom’s fate, too, after her milk production wanes. While many people may argue that not all milk comes from this specific type of operation, there is simply no way to avoid taking milk from a cow that’s meant for a calf, no matter how nicely it’s done.

The writer posing with a cow in a tiny top hat at the Gentle Barn. (Photo courtesy …….

Source: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/vegan-diet-tips-advice-155455160.html